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The Interdisciplinary Work of Lyss England

Posts tagged cannabis

Check out my interview with Maria Papioannoy-Duic here!

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We chat about:

– Maria’s business, Ecig Flavourium
– Relocating to Northumberland County
– Getting into the vape industry
– Being a woman in business
– Harm reduction and vaping as a harm reduction strategy
– Some of the misconceptions about vaping and the vape industry
– The current state of the vape industry
– Similarities between the vape industry and the cannabis industry
– Maria’s hopes for the future of the vape industry

Featured Tunes:
Phasers Set to Thrill by Black Cat Attack
St. Andrews Hall by Nothington
November Hurricane by Jenn Fiorentino
No Words by Tragedy

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Listen to the Podcast (recorded at Rotilicious) HERE!

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Check out our conversation where Brett and I chat about:
– How Brett got into music
– How music keeps him well
– The details on Brett’s long time band, This! is a Crisis (and some updates on his other bands too!)
– Promoting DIY shows
– DIY punk communities
– Why we love punk rock (and how we first got into it)
– How music keeps Brett well
– Medical cannabis use and how it’s beneficial
– Some comments on the new cannabis legislation
– Which strains of cannabis we find most beneficial for managing our symptoms

Featured Tunes:

Nothing Is Fair in Love and War by Dead and Divine
It All Comes Down to You by This! Is a Crisis
High Cholesterol by Keep Flying
A Message To You Rudy by The Specials

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Check out my interview with Adam Bureau where we chat about:
Adam‘s favourite things about Cobourg
– Adam’s career
– The Cobourg DBIA, Downtown Coalition Vitalization Plan and the Board of Management and Adam’s participation in those things
– The Safe and Inclusive Streets Strategy in Cobourg
– Adam’s vision for economic development in Cobourg
– Affordable housing
– The waterfront
– Transit in Cobourg
– Parking in downtown Cobourg
– Snow removal in Cobourg
– Tourism from a “locals first” perspective
– Being a foster parent
– Youth engagement
– How cannabis could be managed in the municipality post-legalization
– Why Adam’s running for council

Featured Tunes:
A New One by The Tattle Tales
Pink Underwood by The Flipsides
In a Letter Never Sent by Even in Blackouts
Suicide Bomber by Against Me!

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Check out my interview with Nicole Beatty! We chat about:

  • Nicole‘s favourite things about living in Northumberland County
  • About Nicole’s career in community development and resource development management
  • What lead Nicole to run for council
  • Nicole’s experience with being a young women running for town council
  • Nicole’s vision for economic development in Cobourg
  • Nicole’s vision for culture and tourism in Cobourg
  • Nicole’s vision for sustainability in Cobourg (including the inflatable floating playground at Cobourg Beach)
  • Nicole’s vision for affordable housing
  • Nicole’s vision for engaging youth in the community (including all-ages show venues and a youth advisory council)
  • Nicole’s advocacy work
  • What community looks like to her
  • Nicole’s favourite Cultivate moment ever
  • Cannabis legalization, the role of municipal government in managing it, and looking to Indigenous communities to learn from them.
  • What song Nicole is learning on uke

 

Local Organizations Nicole is Associated With:

Featured Tunes:
Born to Love You by Ellen Torrie  (Click her name to check out her rad new website!)
I’ll Wait by Sweet Alibi 
Burn the Rapists, Not the Witches by Backyard Riot (From their brand new, locally written and recorded EP!)
Bro Hymn by Pennywise

First, some background…

I am a person who lives with several chronic illnesses and who manages these illnesses through diet, lifestyle, and using cannabis.You can read, in detail, about me discovering the benefits of cannabis here.  I’m a person who initially became a medical cannabis patient under the the MMAR  and then the MMPR. I’m also a person who works full time in the cannabis industry.

I am a person who has, at one point, received a letter from Health Canada telling me I’d no longer have the option to grow for myself.

I never received a letter when some of this legislation was found unconstitutional .Then came the ACMPR. That’s where medical patients sit now. Confused? Here’s a timeline.

The current legislation (assuming you’re not going to actually go through to read all of those links) relies heavily on cannabis production through Licensed Producers (LPs) to supply patients with their medicine. The mass scale of these grows inevitably results in lower quality medicine, due to the complexity of the nature of the plant. There are several reasons for this, one of them being that LPs, by design, are simply not meant to operate in integrity to the plant (or to the benefit of the patient). The object of an LP is to make money in this booming industry, effectively pushing aside “grey” industry experts and patients. In fact, unless you have some investors with major money and influence, and can’t even start an LP. You can really see how this plays out practically when you consider the number of LP owners or investors who are either former cops or politicians.

It’s not uncommon for patients who rely on LPs to have their medicine recalled or unavailable. With the introduction of the recreational legislation, there will be even more pressure on these publicly owned monopolies that already struggle to keep up in a rapidly growing medical market, let alone a recreational one.


Now, some context:

Here are the party’s platforms regarding cannabis legislation:

Liberals:

  • Plan to regulate the sale of cannabis through the Ontario Cannabis Retail Corporation (basically the LCBO)
  • The start up cost is projected to be $48 million and it’s projected to generate a net income of $100 million during the 2020-21 fiscal year

Progressive Conservatives:

  • Although the PCs haven’t released a formal platform, Doug Ford has stated the following:
    • “We’re going down a path that no one really knows.I have been open to a fair market and letting the markets dictate. I don’t like the government controlling anything no matter what it is…. I’m open to a free market and I’m going to consult with our caucus…. I don’t believe in the government sticking their hands in our lives all the time. I believe in letting the market dictate.”
    • “we got to be super, super, super careful” in regulating the cannabis market.

NDP:

  • Andrea Horwath has said:
    • “We don’t want valuable farmland paved over,” said Horwath. “Neither do we want to see it go to massive marijuana crops. We need to see regulation and quality control. People need to know what it is they are selling; people need to know what it is they are buying.”
    • “I don’t know if 40 dispensaries will achieve their goals of taking it off the black market”

Green Party:

  • Regulating and licensing small businesses and dispensaries to sell cannabis in a safe and controlled way
  • Ensuring tax revenues from cannabis sales are used to fund education, mental health and addiction programs
  • Conducting a pilot project to test the private retailing of cannabis by small businesses alongside the LCBO’s new stores during the first two years of legalization

And my critique…

Only 2/4 parties have a clearly defined plan around cannabis legislation, which leads me to believe that the Liberals and Greens are the only parties that understand

a) the vast potential of the cannabis industry

b) the importance of managing medical and recreational access to cannabis for medicinal reasons and also to reduce the black market, and thus, various forms of violence that include criminalizing individuals.

The problem with the Liberals’ approach is that there is opportunity and increased access in the privatized cannabis industry- especially when regulated in addition to publicly owned grows and dispensaries. Relying solely on publicly owned production facilities will put more pressure on Canada’s already flawed LPs. This is bad news for patients who rely on LPs. It also doesn’t leave appropriate space for Indigenous communities, who have exceptionally valuable knowledge about what works in the cannabis industry in a way that centers patients and the plant itself to participate in an industry they’ve had a significant role in building and a cultural right to engage in. 

Similarly, activists (many of whom are patients!) are being persecuted and excluded from the industry they have built through Liberal “legalization”. It’s no secret that people of colour and people with disabilities are disproportionately criminalized for their participation in a grey or black cannabis industry they’re forced to participate in because of the structuring of the Liberal conception of cannabis legislation. In fact, “black people with no history of criminal convictions have been three times more likely to be arrested by Toronto police for possession of small amounts of marijuana than white people with similar backgrounds, according to a Toronto Star analysis.”.

It should be noted, that none of the parties’ platforms include anything regarding pardoning peoples’ prior criminal convictions related to cannabis upon legalization.

The Green’s approach makes the most sense. That being said, I’d like to take the opportunity to briefly elaborate on and provide feedback on the Green’s platform related to cannabis legislation:

“The Green Party believes that the distribution of Cannabis in Ontario is an opportunity to create jobs and boost local business. Allowing for a mix of public and private vendors will allow us to serve many more locations and eradicate black market sales.”

I agree with this. I think it comes down to mixing private and public vendors, so as to increase points of access as much as possible. These multiple points of access are very important-

a) Private businesses with appropriate regulations. Why not create a group of diverse industry experts to brainstorm around what regulations are reasonable to go from there?These regulations ought to specifically provide reasonable space for Indigenous participation in the industry. It also ought to include legislation around smaller-scale craft grows (with multiple tiers containing appropriate regulations according to the size of the grow).

b) Publicly owned businesses (ie. LPs) with a MAJORLY revamped set of regulations that would allow for the plant to be managed in a way that maintains its integrity. This means no pesticides and the use of sustainable practices. 

 

c) The ability for people to grow for themselves with an open genetics market/regulations around restricting genetics. Look no further than California to see what happens when you allow monopolization and restriction of cannabis genetics. Cannabis is a genetically complex and diverse plant that varies greatly in cannabinoid content and creates vastly different effects depends n the strain. What helps one person with some symptoms may be totally different than what helps another, and people ought to be able to access the medicine that works for them.

“Revenue capture in sales must be dedicated to health and education programs that help consumers make informed decisions that protect them, their families and the general public”

Cool. Keep in mind: a key priority should be on preventing stigma against people with disabilities and education ought to be informed by the wisdom of Indigenous people who have used this medicine traditionally for far longer than any of our governments have been involved in regulating it.

“When cannabis is legalized, it should accessible, safe and help local businesses to create employment in both the public and the private sector.”
Again, it comes down to those multiple points of access I discussed earlier.
There’s a lot of world building to do here, but I think that the green Party’s platform is a good place to start. Let’s get to work.

April 13 LIVE @8pm on Northumberland 89.7: Truly local radio:

LISTEN HERE if you missed it live:

https://northumberland897.ca/nothing-exists/2018/4/13/nothing-exists-episode-2

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Join Lyss and guest, Rob Stevenson of Medicine Wheel Natural Healing, to discuss topics such as:
– How and why we started using cannabis
– How and why Rob got involved in the cannabis industry
– How Rob hopes to help support the community in Alderville
– What exactly he means by “Traditional Indigenous Medicine”
– What to expect when you go to Medicine Wheel
– What quality control standards Medicine Wheel has
– All about his new Mukwa product line
– What he has to say about all the other dispensaries opening in Alderville
– What kind of growth we can expect from Medicine Wheel
– All about the True North Seed Bank storefront grand opening on April 20th

Medicine Wheel Natural Healing

 

“Rob Stevenson is an Anishinaabe man of the Bear Clan from Alderville First Nation in Southern Ontario. Rob’s experience with cannabis began through self-medication to help control anxiety and stress. Seeing its benefits for himself, as well as countless friends, family, and acquaintances, Rob has long been a proponent of cannabis as an effective natural medicine. Seeing the difficulty many in his community had with gaining safe access to quality natural medicine, Rob sought a solution to this problem and opened Medicine Wheel Natural Healing…[which] opened its doors on June 21, 2017”

 

Featured Tunes:

“Outta Hand” by The Bombpops

 

“Daphne Did It” by cleopatrick **

“The Depths” by cleopatrick **

** cleopatrick is a Northumberland-local band from Cobourg.
Support The Boys:
05/02 – HAMILTON, ON – THIS AIN’T HOLLYWOOD*
05/03 – LONDON, ON – RUM RUNNERS*
05/04 – ST. CATHARINES, ON – THE WAREHOUSE*
05/05 – PETERBOROUGH, ON – THE RED DOG*
05/10 – GUELPH, ON – EBAR*
05/11 – WINDSOR, ON – THE WINDSOR BEER EXCHANGE*
05/12 – TORONTO, ON – LONGBOAT HALL (CMW)*
06/01 – WASHINGTON, DC – SONGBYRD
06/02 – PHILADELPHIA, PA – ORTLIEBS
06/05 – NEW YORK, NY – TBA