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The Interdisciplinary Work of Lyss England

Posts tagged feminism

Check out my interview with Maria Papioannoy-Duic here!

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We chat about:

– Maria’s business, Ecig Flavourium
– Relocating to Northumberland County
– Getting into the vape industry
– Being a woman in business
– Harm reduction and vaping as a harm reduction strategy
– Some of the misconceptions about vaping and the vape industry
– The current state of the vape industry
– Similarities between the vape industry and the cannabis industry
– Maria’s hopes for the future of the vape industry

Featured Tunes:
Phasers Set to Thrill by Black Cat Attack
St. Andrews Hall by Nothington
November Hurricane by Jenn Fiorentino
No Words by Tragedy

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Check out my interview with a handful of members of the Take Back the Night: Port Hope committee: Sarah Kennedy, Ashley Bouman, Ariel Reilly, and Meghan Sheffield. We chat about:
– The details of TBTN:PH
– How TBTN:PH started (and why)
– Our personal experiences with sex education and learning about consent
– The performers of TBTN:PH
– The sponsors of TBTN:PH

Featured Tunes:
Burn the Rapists, Not the Witches by Backyard Riot
Angela by The Hannigan Sisters****
Natural Born Woman by Kim Doolittle****
Don’t Wanna Know by Deviants and the Odd Man Out****

****Performers at TBTN:PH 2018

August 17 LIVE on Northumberland 89.7 FM Small Town Radio!
LISTEN HERE for the podcast version. 

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Check out my interview with the surreal Jeannette Breward!
We’re gonna talk about:
– incorporating environmentalism and feminism into her work
– Using her body in her work intentionally
– The influence of surrealism on her work
– the inspiration for her surrealist still photographs
– Jeannette’s creative process
– Jeannette’s favourite things about Northumberland County
– All about her film “60 Seasons”
– How creating keeps her well
– What you can expect next from Jeannette- INCLUDING a super cool collaborative film project she and I are working on together! Listen to us brainstorm and discuss what we’ve been thinking about regarding this project. Basically, WITNESS OUR PROCESS!

Featured Music

Suddenly by Sweet Alibi
Into the Dark by Good Lovelies
Mary by Kate Boothman
Birthday Cake by My Son the Hurricane

Listen to the Podcast HERE!

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Leisse Wilcox is a mindset coach and writer from a tiny beachfront town east of Toronto. A mom of three little girls, her passion is working with women to help them dig deep, get clear and confident with who they really are, and help them find, express, and use their voice for good, in a lifestyle-friendly way. Using her uniquely grounded and peacefully honest perspective, she has spoken, been published, and consulted internationally on subjects ranging from self-love, parenting, healing old wounds and creating new behaviour patterns, and social media brand strategy and authenticity.

When not engaged with clients or kids, Leisse can be found stargazing, dreaming about an A-frame cabin in the woods, or anywhere the tacos are.”

We talk all about Leisse’s work. One thing we talk about a lot is, as Leisse puts it, “the paradox of positivity”.

Featuring:

“Positivity Does Not Mean You Get to Tune Out Your Shit” By Leisse Wilcox
“How to Escape and Prevent Toxic Communities” By Lyss England

Featured Tunes:

Lovin’ You Baby by Charles Bradley & The Menahan Street Band
11:11 By Arkells
Good Lover by Donovan Woods
Make It Happen by John Splithoff

aka. “Acknowledging autonomy as a means of building healthier communities”

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(image shows myself and my best friend, Luna the shepherd dog, in an open field surrounded by trees, representing simultaneous autonomy and interconnection).

Can you think of a time in your life where you wanted to be part of a community of people who you grew close with, even loved? Where you put a lot of time and energy into creating that community with some sort of shared goal or intention? Me too.

I’ve been a part of theatre communities where we worked on shows together, activist communities where the shared goal is dismantling rape culture or working towards environmental sustainability, and casual communities where the goal is simply to be friends. Sometimes this more casual community building looks like a group who gets together to share meals or to work together in a garden. Sometimes, like many people in my generation, this means online group chats.

Can you think of a time where you felt let down by your community? Maybe you were going through something really tough and craved the support of the community you’ve worked hard to build. Maybe you felt ignored or under appreciated. I can relate. It’s really easy when we feel this way in our communities to chalk it up to “toxic communities” and honestly, that’s the script that is growing to dominate a lot of modern thought around social justice. But I think that this is an oversimplification at best, and, more honestly, actively detrimental to the overall goal of community care and individual wellness that social justice aims to work towards.

Community building as a concept is complicated and I see a lot of discussion around some of the key pieces these days. Things like self-care, balancing emotional labour, and accountability. While it’s exciting that these discussions are happening at all, and it’s to be expected that thinkers will stumble their ways through these complex and imperfect topics, I, a white, queer, disabled woman who lives with CPTSD, am increasingly finding that the shallow way we discuss this stuff is more harmful than helpful.

Basically, what I’m asserting here is that the problem isn’t that we are building toxic communities, it’s that we are empowering individuals to engage in behaviours that are toxic to themselves, and thus, toxic when it comes to building healthier communities. We mistake enabling self-harming behaviours for care in attempt to acknowledge that the violence perpetrated against marginalized people is real and unfair. However, by encouraging a victim mindset, we effectively marginalize people who have been affected by systemic violence even further.

I don’t believe that it is my job (or my business) to dictate how anyone else chooses to cope with or react to their experiences in the world. I believe that is up to each individual, and that building healthier communities relies on each individual to do their own work. It’s easier, when we have experienced trauma and/or violence to follow scripts where we validate one another’s pain (effectively playing in to the same power dynamics we claim to be working to dismantle) rather than addressing and taking ownership for our own experiences and subsequent (re)actions.

What it comes down to for me, as an individual, is this: do I want to commit to my trauma and live in it, or do I want to live my best life where I acknowledge my trauma without allowing it to control my life?

In the context of a society where there are unequal distributions of power, I would agree that it’s true that one cannot fully control what happens to them or every event of their lives, but what one can control is how they choose to respond to what happens. When it comes to community building, when we are all so committed to living in our own emotional shit, we tend to project that on to other people in our community.

For me, my dissatisfaction in communities I’ve experienced as toxic has a lot less to do with anyone else’s actions but my own dissatisfaction with myself. This results in me being so wrapped up in how worthless I feel (because trauma stuff) and feeling so bad about how I’m not feeling cared for by my community that I’m not being a good community member either. I’m not actually taking care of myself in a deep way either. I’m just wallowing in my own shit. Living there. Committing to it. It’s a lot easier to chalk my feelings up to other peoples’ actions rather than taking ownership for my own and doing something to actively work with whatever it is I’m going through. It keeps me trapped in my own shit.

Escaping and preventing toxic communities comes down to changing our perspectives from “they did this to me and this feels awful” to “this happened and it feels awful because I’m perceiving it as something that was done TO me that I have no control over.”. The reality is that you do have control over what you do with your hurt. Sure, communicating to the person you felt hurt by may be helpful, but what will be really helpful is you changing your perception (and thus, your reality) of the hurtful thing. It’s not about ignoring the hurt or “choosing not to feel it”. I mean, that sounds nice, but we all know it’s not that simple. It’s about feeling it and acknowledging that it probably had nothing to do with you and everything to do with the other person/people. What is yours is your reaction. When we accept people for where they are at, it makes for far healthier and happier interpersonal relationships. And when we can’t reconcile where someone’s at with the reality we’re choosing to actively build for ourselves, we get to choose the context in which you relate to that person.

This isn’t to say that we should stick around people who contribute to us feeling bad or who we don’t ultimately feel are conducive to our journey in wellness. It’s also not about anyone being “at fault”. It’s never so simple as a simple perpetrator/victim dynamic. We are all hurt beings in some way, we are all trying to stumble our way to happiness and fulfillment. But what I think we, as social justice oriented thinkers and carers, would benefit from is actually acknowledging the role of autonomy in community building.

(Big thanks to Sabrina Scott and Susan Kesper for taking the time to provide feedback on this piece and supporting me in making it better!)

 

 

 

 

 

June 1 LIVE on Northumberland 89.7 FM Small Town Radio!

LISTEN HERE if you missed it!

Check out my interview with the wonderful Tyson Galloway !

We’re gonna chat about balancing priorities (like being a professional musician AND a dad AND a husband AND a music teacher), making music as a means of being well, teaching music, and being a man who is invested in learning about feminism.

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Born and raised in Cobourg, Tyson is a freelance musician, currently instructing at Long and McQuade. He is experienced in a variety of forms of music from jazz to country. On the side, he’s a husband and father, as well as a nature and history buff. Tyson can be seen, locally, with acts like Washboard Hank and Madman’s Window.

Featured Music

Sugar by Ellen Torrie

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Maxwell Murder by Rancid

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Autumn Leaves by Tyson, Julian, and Clayton

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May 25 LIVE on Northumberland 89.7 FM Small Town Radio

LISTEN HERE if you missed it live!

Check out my interview with a woman who may as well be my twin (seriously! we were born 2 days apart!). She’s got a lot of good things to say, def worth the listen.

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Cailey McCormack is a young professional with a heart of gold from Port Hope. She is a lover of the outdoors, dogs, and wellness all while building a successful career. She’s passionate about social justice, and has a unique and compassionate approach to her activism, operating from the perspective that people come from good intentions and that it’s useful to meet them where they’re at. She says, “when creating positive change in any kind of community you can’t underestimate the power of effective and compassionate communication”.

Cailey is also a valuable thinker and world-builder when it comes to the concept of minimalism, connecting it to overall health and wellness in an accessible, practical way.

Cailey is a fixture at Turtle John’s Friday night karaoke in Port Hope, ranging in song choice from Sublime to Johnny Cash. When she’s not making change in her community, you can often find Cailey hanging out with her one year old dachshund, Reese, at her family’s cabin in the woods.

 

Featured Music: