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The Interdisciplinary Work of Lyss England

Posts tagged green wood coalition

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Check out this special update episode of The Nothing Exists Radio Hour!

In segment 1, David Sheffield and I discuss Green Wood Coalition and Local Food for Local Good‘s “Around the Table Thanksgiving Challenge” fundraiser! We talk about how to participate in the fundraiser and what the money goes to help fund.

In segment 2, Avril Ewing and I discuss the Port Hope Candidates debate- Town Hall Style cohosted by us, “two local women“. We address some of the concerns and feedback about the event and also explain our reasoning behind running it the way we are.

BONUS- you get to hear the ad that will be playing starting tomorrow on Northumberland 89.7 for Take Back the Night: Port Hope (you’ll be hearing lots more about this exciting event over the next few weeks!).

Featured Tunes:
Fuck the World by The Unlovables
Dear Beer by The Bombpops
This Time For Real by Lipstick Homicide

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August 17 LIVE on Northumberland 89.7 FM Small Town Radio!
LISTEN HERE for the podcast version. 

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Tune in to hear my interview with my good friend (and low key mentor) David Sheffield. We are gonna talk about Green Wood Coalition, affordable housing, art, poetry, local events, frontline social work, harm-reduction, building community, and more. 

“I’ve lived in various parts of Ontario, but Northumberland County has been my home since 1986. My wife, Beth, and I settled here at that time, and have always felt that this was a great place to raise our four children. I often note that my children have been my best teachers, and that’s more true today than ever. We have four grandchildren, also living in this area, and we are enjoying the new discoveries they have brought to our lives.

My work in community outreach started 10 years ago, but I think I was being guided to this place by many years of life experience. This feels more like a vocation than a job. Much of my career was in the painting trade, while spending off hours in community engagement through art projects, meals, church activities, music festivals and campfires. My writing—poetry and non-fiction—has been published in a variety of periodicals and anthologies. Writing is my favourite way to process some of the difficult days that one can encounter in this kind of work.

These days, I’m the Community Director at Green Wood Coalition, which is a people-level response to the disconnection of poverty and related social struggles. The work is difficult, at times, but also very inspiring because of the resilience of individuals that I encounter, and the encouragement of many people who work alongside me.”

If you wanna read the article Gareth Vieira wrote about poets, including David and I, click here.

To learn more about Art Hives, click here.

Learn more about Overdose Awareness Day Northumberland here. 

Features Tunes:
Roll Away the Stone by Carlos Del Junco and Jimmy Bowskill
I Will by Christa Couture
Shelter Valley Road by David Newland
Barley by Birds of Chicago

April 27 LIVE @8pm on Northumberland 89.7: Truly local radio:
LISTEN HERE if you missed it live!

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Join Lyss and guest, Jeff Caine, to discuss topics including:
– The Stars of Port Hope Civic Awards
– An update on Green Wood Coalition
– The recent sexist terrorist attack in Toronto and “incels”
– Redefining masculinity/what men can do about this
– Jeff’s career in the finance world
– Community theatre (specifically, on-stage kissing, among other things)
– Jeff’s radio show

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“Jeff Caine is a die-hard, newly award-winning Port Hope resident. Radio personality, finance dude, and semi-professional Good Guy, you can listen to Jeff on Northumberland 89.7 on his show “Northumberland Focus”, Mondays at noon. Jeff has a long history of involvement with the radio station, has sat on the Green Wood Coalition board for several years, is involved in community theatre with the Northumberland Players, sits on committees with the Municipality of Port Hope, and sits on the Take Back the Night Port Hope committee.

A news fanatic and closet wrestling fan, Jeff is passionate about his community, his friends, and not being a complete and total jerk.”

Featured Tunes:

“Angela” (Lumineers cover) by The Hannigan Sisters (of Clan Hannigan)
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I heard The Hannigan Sisters (Eile and Ayisha) play tonight at The Stars of Port Hope Civic Awards and they sounded gorgeous. So gorgeous, in fact, I made a video of the second song they sang and came home to convert it to an MP3 so you can all hear just how gorgeous that 3.5 minutes was.
These teens also play with their family’s band, Clan Hannigan, which also includes their very talented mum, Saskia Tomkins.

“I’m Done” by Bad Cop / Bad Cop

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Based out of LA, this feminist punk band is signed to Fat Wreck Chords and released their most recent album, “Warriors”, in June of 2017.
The story behind their new album is especially powerful. After the release of their first album, “Not Sorry”, Bad Cop/Bad Cop toured often and one of their singers, Stacey Dee, began partying too hard. It began to affect the band, but with the support of her bandmates and her label, Stacey was able to receive treatment and work towards wellness.
“Warriors” is the product of Stacey reuniting with her bandmates to create something new after a significantly challenging experience.
“We tend to stick up for the underdog,” Dee concludes. “It hurts us when anyone is marginalized. I was so negative for most of my life. After changing my life, I have been trying to focus on strength, connectedness and positivity. I think this record is a good start.”

 

“Chick Singer” by Winona Wilde

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“A child of Iraqi parents, [Winona Wilde] was born Noosa Al-Sarraj and became infatuated with playing classical music on piano at a young age. At the same time, her country music-loving nanny planted the seeds for her future devotion to artists like John Prine, Hank Williams and Loretta Lynn, and by her teens she discovered a natural ability to write songs in a similar style.

Noosa explains, ‘On my first album, I was too afraid to be good. On my second album, I was too afraid to be real. This time I feel like I am as real as I can possibly be, and the songwriting is infinitely more vulnerable.’”

The woman who describes her music as “Canadian Feminist Folk” mostly calls Peterborough home and can be found playing just about all over the place. Winona Wilde‘s newest album “Wasted Time” just came out this past October 6. Lurk her facebook pagewebsitespotify, or bandcamp for all things Winona Wilde.

The intention of this project is to promote healing and storytelling through community and performance. There will be an open call to anyone who wishes to get involved in the process of creating a piece of performance art regarding the topic of disordered eating and performance.

There will be efforts made to encourage a wide range of people to participate in the workshopping and performing process. This includes diversity in age, gender, race, sexual orientation, ability level, and type of disability. While, ideally, most of the collective would be comprised of people living with disordered eating behaviours, it may also be interesting to hear from people supporting loved ones living with disordered eating behaviours or people who work closely with performers living with disordered eating behaviours. There is no cost to participants associated with this program.

There will be a five week series of workshops where this group of people will discuss things such as:

How does disordered eating affect performers? How does disordered eating affect performance itself?

What is performance?

What is disordered eating?

How does performance affect people physically and emotionally?

The difference between intentional and unintentional performances regarding disordered eating

Is there a place for people with disordered eating behaviours in spaces that promote performance?

How can we support one another regarding disordered eating behaviours?

while also taking care of ourselves?

How can being creative contribute to healing?

How does body image affect performance?

The lived experiences of performers with disordered eating behaviours?

Any people involved in the workshopping process will be invited to work on the actual writing of the performance based on the notes from the workshopping process. The format of performance will be discussed amongst collective (monologues? One act play? Music? Dance? Movement? Visual art? Combination?) There will be 4 rehearsals and two performances at the end of the workshopping process. Tickets will be sold for $20 each, with compensated and discounted tickets available to anyone who would like to attend, but cannot afford the ticket price. There will also be a “pay what you can” donation jar available at all performances and throughout the workshopping and rehearsal process.

Other topics will likely come up, and anyone involved in the collective will encouraged to bring up topics that are relevant to the project. Notes will be taken at each workshop. Workshops will be co-facilitated by Lyss England and Jillien Hone. Workshops will be done according to To the Root’s community discussion format.

 

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collabart.JPGThe above is a collaborative piece of art that was produced during the process of The Performance and Disordered Eating Project. The artists involved are Lyss, Jill, Lindsey, MJ, Clayton, and Marcela.

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The Performance and Disability Project, presented in partnership with To the Root Community Discussions and Green Wood Coalition in Port Hope Downtown, is a collectively formed piece of performance art on the topic of disability and performance. With the intention of promoting healing and storytelling through community and performance, there was an open call to anyone in the Northumberland community who wanted to participate in such a project. Once the collective, which is comprised of about ten people, was formed, we began to meet at Green Wood Coalition’s space on John Street, in Port Hope, where we took part in a series of five community discussions centered around the topic. What underlies these discussions is a collective intention to care for ourselves and one another, and to remain committed to anti-oppressive practice- and creativity. Rather than positioning the facilitator (Lyss England of To the Root) as an authoritative expert, members of the collective are considered an expert on their own lived experience. Outlines and notes from all five community discussions can be found at performanceanddisabilityproject.tumblr.com.

While engaging in this five week long workshopping process, folks in the collective kept in mind the creative end product (which was presented as a very open concept- simply that of “performance”), and begin to work on a creative ways to present their story and experiences regarding disability. Although most of this collective has no previous performance experience, we have worked towards feeling comfortable sharing our stories through various means of performance such as poetry reading, monologues, a short silent scene, and performance art. After the five workshops, we moved into Ontario Street Theatre  to spend three weeks running through our show.

It has been a process that has allowed folks in the collective to explore ourselves creatively, gain support from one other, and to stand in our own power to share our stories and experiences on our own terms. Therapeutic processes can sometimes seem daunting to participants because the end product (feeling safe, comfortable, and supported) seems so far out of reach. Contrastingly, theatrical and performance processes are often so focused on the end product that the process (including emotional and physical components) becomes secondary to the end product. This format fuses therapeutic process with creative end product. The best of both worlds. Our show is raw, honest, and paradigm shifting. Most importantly, it creates a space for the stories of people who are too often pushed aside in our community.

Shows are July 24 at 7pm and July 26 at 2pm at Ontario Street Theatre in Port Hope, Ontario. $20 per ticket (contact Lyss at totherootdiscussions@gmail.com if this price makes the show inaccessible to you). Contact Lyss England (totherootdiscussions@gmail.com) or Sean Carthew to reserve tickets, or show up at the door. Proceeds go to Green Wood Coalition and future To the Root projects. Physically accessible, sober space with immediate peer support available on site. Big thanks to Northumberland Sunrise Rotary for funding!

 

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From www.greenwoodcoalition.com

We’re pleased to partner with To the Root facilitator and theatre activist, Lyss England, in presenting the Disability & Performance Project over 8 weeks, beginning June 2. This series of Tuesday evening workshops, presented at our space, 17 John St., Port Hope and the Ontario Street Theatre, and will consist of five three-hour long workshop evenings on topics related to performance and disability, three three-hour long evenings of rehearsal, and two performances. There is no cost for this great series, so if you’d like to be involved, contact Lyss at totherootdiscussions@gmail.com.

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Click here to view notes from the entire collaborative performance.

 

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