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The Interdisciplinary Work of Lyss Warmland.

Posts tagged mental health

Check out my conversation with Matt Kowalyk about In Absentia Theatre here!

We talk about:

Check out my interview with my brother, Eric England!

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(cropped) photo by Jeannette Breward.

We talk about:

  • his diverse career so far
  • different ways of grieving
  • managing anxiety, insomnia, and nocturnal panic attacks
  • Traumatic brain injuries
  • hockey culture
  • the benefits of making music
  • and more!!

 

Featured Tunes:

Freewill by Rush
Adia by Sarah McLaughlin
Good News by Mac Miller
Everything I Wanted by Billie Eilish

(PhotoCheck out my interview with Phil Redford from the Coldest Night of the Year organizing committee!

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(Photo by Jeannette Breward)

We talk all about what it’s like organizing the event and the wonderful local organization it’s raising funds for, Green Wood Coalition.

To sign up, click here.

To donate to my fundraising efforts, click here.

To learn more about Green Wood Coalition, click here.

Check out my conversation with Kristiane Black!

Kristiane Black
We talk about:
– Aesthetic energy
– Her work at Trinity United church in Cobourg
– What faith and social justice mean to Kristiane
– What it means to be engaged in her community and why it’s important to her
– Encouraging healing and recovery
– Kristiane’s take on Transition House’s role in the community
– advocating for mental health treatment and understanding
– How the work she does keeps her well

Check out my conversation with Kristie Salter!

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We talk about:

  • the path to becoming an RMT
  • the connection between mental and physical health
  • living as a working professional with ADHD
  • getting diagnosed with ADHD
  • various ways Kristie treats her ADHD
  • the transition to using cannabis as medicine
  • resilience and life after big traumatic events
  • how Kristie’s work keeps her well

and more!

 

Featured Tunes:
Picture of Health by Muncie Girls
It’s Gonna Rain All Day by Dan Adriano in the Emergency Room
Gold Guns Girls by Metric
You Were Right by Cuff the Duke

Check out my interview with Maureen Pollard!

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Maureen has worked in the field of social work since 1991. In private practice since 2011, Maureen is a specialist in traumatic bereavement, helping individuals, families and groups navigate life after losses, including pregnancy and infant loss, child death, suicide loss, homicide loss and sudden or accidental death. Maureen is a certified Compassionate Bereavement Care provider, and she is trained in RTS Bereavement Care (Resolve Through Sharing). In June 2019, she published The Twentieth Year: A Memoir of Miscarriage, a book that tells the story of her journey through multiple miscarriages to parenthood, and how her personal grief experiences influences her work.

 

Social work website: maureenpollardmsw.com 

Author website: maureenmwrites.com

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MaureenPollardMSW/

Twitter and Instagram handle: @rhythmsinlife 

We talk about:

  • What inspired her to get into social work and specialize in the things she does
  • What kind of training she draws from in her professional practice
  • Her book, “The Twentieth Year: Memoirs of Miscarriage”
  • The process of writing and publishing her book
  • Being public about recurrent miscarriage and early pregnancy
  • Pregnancy after recurrent miscarriage
  • Grief and peoples’ reactions to it
  • How to maintain professional boundaries as someone working with people who have also experienced recurrent pregnancy loss (and other types of traumatic loss)
  • What Maureen wants people to know about recurrent pregnancy loss
  • What Maureen wants youth and parents of youth to know about mental health and suicide
  • How Maureen’s work has contributed to her being well

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Featured Music by:

Sincere Engineer
David Newland
Ellen Torrie
Cale Crowe

 

LISTEN TO THE EPISODE HERE!

 

Check out my interview with Saskia and Dana of Northumberland Parents Empowering Parents!

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We talk all about youth mental health and this new group for parents to talk about how to approach youth mental health from a parenting perspective. Part way through the interview, we’re also joined by Dana’s daughter, Kira, who shares some insight about being a teenager in Northumberland County right now- and she plays a song live, in studio!

Featured Tunes:

Matt’s Song by The Soviettes
10 000 Miles by Clan Hannigan
Angela (Lumineers cover) by The Hannigan Sisters
Eyes Closed (Halsey cover) by Kira Gelineau

Check out my conversation with Kat Mokus!

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We talk about:

  • 2spirit and nonbinary gender identities
  • Kat’s creative work, including their zines, through Disabled Femme
  • The intersection between mental health and physical disability
  • Why access to cannabis is important
  • Gender-neutral pronouns
  • Keyboard activism
  • Kat’s new project, Accessible Resiliency
  • Various types of therapy and our favourite coping strategiesFeatured Tunes:Corn Dog Sonnet No.7 by Sincere Engineer
    Rotten Egg by Avem
    Grow Up/Stay Young by The Anti-Queens
    Realness by RuPaul

Additional Stuffs:

twitter: mx_kat_mokus
instagram: mx.kat, accessibleresiliency
Kat in Broken Pencil

 

Content: mention of self harm, suicidal ideation, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, rape, disordered eating, self-harm, consensual sex, naked bodies, posting nudes online

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There are two things you need to know about me right off the bat if we’re going to talk about this:

1. I used to be really into self harming and I also have Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. The combination of these things manifested for me as an eating disorder when I was a teenager and coping with trauma. I developed dysmorphia, which means I didn’t see myself the way I was. The way I saw myself was distorted.

2. I was raped when I was seventeen.

Okay, heavy, I know. But it’s all good, I’m still here. And, no word of a lie, taking and generously sharing nude photographs was one of the key contributions of my wellness plan during, arguably, the most significant time in my recovery.

I was in university, the most crushing waves of grief around my mom’s death had run their course, I had my own apartment, and I had embarked upon the most exciting a sexually adventurous relationship of my life. I was learning that sex could be powerful and sweet and absolutely filthy all at once and it was incredibly healing. This intimate new relationship also meant that I was accountable to a person who cared deeply about me and who I connected with on a level I’d barely even ever dreamed was possible before it happened. It meant I had to stop cutting and start eating, even if it was almost unbearably uncomfortable.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is characterized by obsessions, often in the form of “intrusive thoughts” that infiltrate your brain repeatedly until you’re ready to do anything to get rid of them. My intrusive thoughts focus on either contamination or suicide. I’m either obsessed with the things in food I become convinced are killing me or I’m repeating over and over in my head “I wanna die I wanna die I wanna die…”. Starving myself became one of my compulsions. I’d go through rituals around counting calories or simply restricting compulsively. When that stopped being a feasible option since it became so difficult to hide, I decided I needed to find a healthier way of feeling good and in control of my body.

The good news is that, as I mentioned, this was also a sexually explosive time in my life. I was living an hour and a half away from my new partner and, as many young couples do, we used technology to stay connected (okay, and to get off). We’d sext and send nudes and I realized how much I got off on it. I loved the intimacy, the (seemingly, anyway) undivided attention, and providing something that gave pleasure to someone who gave me so much pleasure. I got to engage with my own body on my terms in a way that felt good to me- a huge deal for any sexual assault survivor and for someone who had a history of disordered eating. I was finally feeling good in my body.

I started a blog of nude photos online. I loved the engagement, just being honest and confident in my body. Repeatedly posting photos where I had chosen the pose, the body part(s), the time of day I posted- everything. I got to choose how I responded to any comments (if at all). I got to choose my aesthetic- trashy, authentic punk girl. I came up with a name (based on a song my partner had written about my blowjob skills) and it was a blast. There’s something about repetition that really works for me. Repetition and intentionality. Writing things out (like “things that feel good“, saying things out loud a few times, and posting nudes.

I had control, I had a reaction, and I was learning what it felt like to love and appreciate the body I was in and the ways in which it contributed to me feeling good.

I read about a woman who was a professional (or semi-professional?) vocalist. When she lost her hearing, she learned to memorize the way the sounds felt in her body. That’s kind of how I  started to feel about my body when I was posting nudes regularly as a person with dysmorphia. Each time I went through the process, it felt good. So I began to associate my body with good. Being in my body felt good, and that is something I’m grateful I learned.

I don’t post nudes publicly anymore, though I sometimes send them to my partner or my girlfriends. But I still hold on to that feeling. It’s like that work during that time in my process flipped a switch for me. I can honestly say that taking nudes contributed positively to my mental health.